General Education Courses

DLLL

AP/DLLL 1000 6.0 World Literatures in Perspective

Course Description

This course examines literary works from around the globe that have had a major influence beyond their own time and place and explores how they take on new meanings as they move across linguistic, cultural and temporal borders. By examining literary works alongside such disciplines as linguistics, philosophy, history, art, cultural studies, theatre and film studies, the course pays attention to such topics as translation, cross-cultural contacts and exchange, and analyses processes by which concepts of 'national' and 'world' literature are constructed.

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.

English as a Second Language

AP/ESL 1000 6.0 Canadian Language and Culture

Course Description

(Crosslisted to AP/HUMA 1220 6.0)This course has two main objectives. First, it aims at fostering those language skills which students using English as a second language need to succeed academically in the multicultural, English-medium context at York. The course accomplishes this goal primarily through content, rather than explicit language exercises, as is appropriate to learners at the university level. Second, the course aims to promote students' awareness of various aspects of Canadian society through the discussion and analysis of a range of texts exploring themes such as language and communication, culture and identity, and Canada's diverse communities.

Note: This course comprises the English as a second language requirement for incoming English as a second language students.
Course credit exclusions: AP/ESL 1450 6.0.

AP/ESL 1450 6.0 Thinking About Contemporary Canada

Course Description

(Crosslisted to AP/HUMA 1745 6.0) Examines issues critical to Canadian society and culture through texts representing a range of voices and genres - from text to film, official to creative, rooted in Canada to immigrant. Key themes include those of arrival, belonging and the idea of nation. The course also aims to enhance English language and critical thinking skills necessary for academic success in university study.

Note: This course comprises the English as a second language requirement for students with an ESL background.
Course credit exclusions: AP/ESL 1000 6.0.

AP/ESL 1010 3.0 Advancing Reading and Writing in Academic Contexts

Course Description

This course aims to help students from an ESL background to improve writing and reading skills necessary for academic success in undergraduate degree programs. The interdisciplinary course draws on a range of topics and texts to help students understand and communicate academic content and ideas. Emphasis is placed on strengthening language and critical thinking skills in reading and writing that promote student engagement with a range of texts relevant to academic studies.

Prerequisites: AP/ESL 1000 6.00 or AP/ESL 1450 6.00. AP/ESL1450 6.00 can also be a corequisite.
Open to: Undergraduate students from an ESL background.
Not open to: Undergraduate students who speak English with native proficiency.

Approved HUMA General Education course for AP.

AP/ESL 1015 3.0 Advancing Oral Communication for ESL Students

Course Description

This course aims to help students from an ESL background advance their oral communication skills for academic success. The focus is on strategies for interacting in groups and with individuals, as well as presenting formally and informally. The course draws on theories of interaction and practical applications for effective oral communication in a variety of academic, professional and social contexts.

Prerequisites: AP/ESL 1000 6.00 or AP/ESL 1450 6.00. AP/ESL1450 6.00 can also be a corequisite.
Open to: Undergraduate students from an ESL background.
Not open to: Undergraduate students who speak English with native proficiency.

Approved HUMA General Education course for AP.

AP/ESL 1200 Society and Culture

Course Description

This course provides an introduction to topics in the social sciences for students from an ESL background. The content focuses on social issues and the diversity of human experience while addressing the development of English language communication skills essential for academic success. The approach is interdisciplinary and aims to foster critical thought, broaden perspectives and develop understanding of rhetorical patterns and styles.

Approved SOSC General Education course for AP.

German

AP/GER 1790 9.0 Nationalism, Authority and Resistance: Perspectives on German Culture and Society

Course Description

(Crosslisted to AP/HUMA 1190 9.0)Germany might exemplify the problems, conflicts, and possibilities of the modern world better than any other single state. It has careened from an open democracy to brutal dictatorship, been united, divided, and united again in a little over 100 years, embraced the rational optimism of the Enlightenment and the racism of Nazi Germany culminating in the Holocaust. This course examines cultural representations of contemporary and historical Germany from an interdisciplinary perspective. Examining cultural, political and social discourses, we will consider the tensions that have characterized ""Germany"" historically and in the present day through the lens of texts that include e.g. literature, film, art, journalistic and political writing. Particular attention will be paid to: Nationalism and multiculturalism, authority and resistance, competing visions of democracy or freedom, religion and rationalism, the role of Germany in Europe and the world, and the effect of the past on contemporary German society.
Course credit exclusions: AP/GER 2790 9.0 (prior to Fall 2014), AP/HUMA 2190 9.0 (prior to Fall 2014).

AP/GER 1791 9.0 The Fairy Tale: From Grimm to Disney

Course Description

Pervasive in most cultures across the globe, fairy tales thrive because of their universal nature. Fairy tales are more than just children's literature. They encapsulate in (usually) succinct form many of the most pressing concerns of human existence: family conflict, the struggle for survival, sexual desire, the quest for happiness, among many others. Published about 200 years ago, Brothers Grimm's Fairy Tales remains one of the most iconic pieces of literature and has had significant influence on modern pop culture. This course examines fairy tales in the context of their longevity, their origins, and their ever-changing roles in media and popular culture.

Approved HUMA General Education course for AP.

Italian

AP/IT 1751 6.0 The Great Ideas and the Masterworks

Course Description

(Crosslisted to AP/HUMA 1751 6.0)This interdisciplinary course examines Italy's contribution to the development of Western culture from the Middle Ages to the Age of Romanticism. We study representative works which illustrate three main aspects of Italian civilization: artistic creation (literature and the visual arts), politics, and philosophy. The focus is on the role played by Italian writers, thinkers, artists, and scientists in shaping the tradition of liberty at the heart of the cultural heritage of the West. Course credit exclusions: AP/IT 2751 9.0. Previously offered as: AP/IT 1751 9.0.

Approved HUMA General Education course for AP.

AP/IT 1761 9.0 Italian Cinema, Literature and Society

Course Description

(Crosslisted to AP/HUMA 1761 6.0)The course focuses on 12 of the most significant films since the Second World War in the context of the radical changes that have taken place in Italy from the fall of Fascism to the present, and as critical statements on the phenomena connected with the rapid transformation of Italian society: industrialization and the economic miracle, urbanization, the crisis of traditional values, and postmodern fragmentation.
Course credit exclusions: AP/IT 2761 9.00, AP/HUMA 2671 9.00 (prior to Fall 2014).
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/IT 2761 9.00.

Approved HUMA General Education course for AP.

AP/IT 1791 6.0 Migration, Immigration and Beyond: Italians in North America

Course Description

This course investigates the effects North American culture and language has on the lives of Italian immigrants and their descendants.
PRIOR TO FALL 2014: Course credit exclusions: AP/IT 2791 9.00, AP/SOSC 2960 9.00.

Approved SOSC General Education course for AP.