New Courses

New DLLL Courses for 2019-2020

Chinese

AP/CH 3800 6.0 Canadian Chinese Diasporic Literature
This blended course combines both online teaching and face-to-face instruction to study Chinese-Canadian literature from as early as the 1890 to contemporary times written by descendants of early Chinese immigrants as well as new Chinese immigrants. It focuses mainly on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays, and drama both in English and Chinese. While examining these works' artistic qualities, it provides an This blended course combines both online teaching and face-to-face instruction to study Chinese-Canadian literature from as early as the 1890 to contemporary times written by descendants of early Chinese immigrants as well as new Chinese immigrants. It focuses mainly on fiction but including also poetry, prose essays, and drama both in English and Chinese. While examining these works' artistic qualities, it provides an overview of Chinese Canadian history and explores diasporic topics of social and cultural identity, the interaction between traditional roots and the new environment, and between cultural assimilation and resistance, and between Chinese immigrants and other ethnic communities, as reflected in these works.

AP/CH 3850 3.0 Christianity. Christian Culture and Modern Chinese Culture and Literature
This course examines the impact of Christianity and Christian culture on modern Chinese culture and society since the early twentieth century. Through the analysis of selected works written by novelists, scholars, theologians and church leaders, students will gain insights into the complex relationship between Christian culture and Chinese society as a whole and the role of Christianity in the development of Chinese modernity.

The course offers insights into the impact of Christian thought and praxis in the context of Chinese history, its culture and traditional values, as well as its political system. While the focus of the course is on the modern era, students are presented with some basic historical background of Christianity in China since its introduction in the early Tang Dynasty (seventh to tenth century C.E.), when Nestorianism gained a foothold in China. This course provides students with an understanding of the checkered history of the cultural interaction between Christianity and Chinese culture, as well as of the major foci of contention: ethical and hierarchical values (Confucianism); and theological, cosmological and philosophical assumptions (Buddhism, Daoism and Islam).

Through the application of various disciplinary approaches, such as cross-cultural and postcolonial studies as well as comparative religious studies, students will examine concepts such as cultural hegemony and the collective unconscious and analyze relevant case studies.
Prerequisites: permission of instructor

AP/CH 4810 6.00 Introduction to English-Chinese Translation
This course is designed for students with advanced proficiency in English and Chinese. It introduces theories and skills in English-Chinese translation and applies them to different types of texts in various fields. Students may work on final projects in their own field. While including translation from Chinese to English in discussion, the course focuses on translation from English to Chinese.

The first semester focuses on general theories and translation techniques at the lexical and syntactic levels. The course begins with an introduction to translation history and theories in China and the West, in particular issues under constant debate, such as domestication and foreignization. Equipped with a historical and theoretical framework for translation, students work with authentic bilingual materials and conduct a comparative study between English and Chinese languages and cultures. The comparative study helps students explore different techniques to tackle the problems encountered when translating words, sentences, and short paragraphs, laying the foundations for the translation of a wide range of genres.

The second semester builds upon this foundation and moves to different topics of translation. Texts selected will cover literary and applied translation in the fields of politics, business, media, health care, law, science and technology, etc. Students learn advanced techniques about coherence and cohesion at the textual level and develop ability to critically understand cultural contexts and analyze translated texts. Through practical hand-on exercises, students are capable of translating various types of texts competently.

Prerequisites: Bilingualism. Students must be fluent in both English and Chinese. Placement test required prior to enrolment.
Language of Instruction: Chinese and English

Korean

AP/KOR 3610 6.0 Contemporary Korea: Korean Popular Culture and the Korean Wave
This course examines the socio-culture meaning of the Korean popular cultural phenomenon in terms of Korea's globalization and of the transnational processes of production, distribution, and consumption of Korean popular culture.
Course credit exclusion: AP/KOR 3610 3.00

AP/KOR 4500 3.0 A Taste of Korean: Korean Foodways and Culture
This course examines Korean foodways, that is, the language, history, society, traditions, and economics of Korean (and Korean-Canadian) food culture. Food is common to all humankind, but different cuisines also serve to identify nations, religious groups, socio-economic classes and other communities, marking boundaries between ourselves and “others.” Through a wide range of readings, the course will enhance students’ understanding of the Korean culture embedded in the history of Korean foodways. The topics covered will include the relationships between Korean food and globalism/localisation, national identities and socioeconomic status shown in the changes in Korean food culture, premodern food consumptions, the role of food media in the contemporary Korean foodways, the cultural beliefs encapsulated in food language, and the nature of Korean food culture in the GTA. The topics covered include the relationships between local food practices and larger socioeconomic and political trends, the importance of food to national identity, the influence of media’s reinforcement of gender and socioeconomic class ideologies in relationship to food production and consumption. The course will also introduce students to concepts and research methods used in the interdisciplinary study of food culture.
EE Components:
1) Invited lectures by chefs and food writers (such as Sanghyeon Kim)
2) Evaluation component: Report on a culinary experience in the local Korean-Canadian community
The language of instruction is English. S ome materials may be presented in the Korean alphabet, Hangeul, but all the Korean examples are glossed in English.